Fashion: Look suitable for interviews

Fashion: Look suitable for interviews

Written by Muleskinner Staff

By SHELBY BILBRUCK
Columnist
(WARRENSBURG, Mo., digitalBURG) — With job fairs and mock interviews popping up all over campus, it’s good to know two things: how to answer the dreaded “tell me about yourself” question and how to dress to the nines to help land any interview.

Shelby Bilbruck
PHOTO BY ANDREA LOPEA / FEATURES EDITOR

When it comes to professional dress, you should always have sophisticated pantsuits, skirt suits and dresses on hand. Here’s some suitable head to toe options.
The top of your outfit is usually the most tricky. Finding a good pair of pants is simple, but finding a blazer to match and a shirt to go underneath, is a little more difficult.
Start out with a simple white button-up or blouse. Interviews are not the time to make a fashion statement with a pop of neon green or dark purple sticking out of your blazer. Go for subtle colors like white or pastels.
Next, add a blazer. Full-length sleeves should not go above your wrist and if you already tend to push your sleeves up, opt for a three quarters length sleeve instead.
For the bottom, skinny dress pants shouldn’t go above your ankle. Also keep in mind that wider cuts like flare pants should sit just above the bottom of your shoe. If they have belt loops, find a nice belt matching the suit color, and don’t leave without it on.
Skirts should never be any higher than three inches above your knee and shouldn’t be skin tight. Give yourself room to walk, sit and cross your legs. Don’t forget to wear tights underneath, too.
Shoes can include flats, boots and heels for your interview apparel. If you wear heels, they should never be higher than 3.75 inches.
All jewelry you choose to wear should be simple and shouldn’t make sounds when you walk or move. That includes taking out any facial piercings and only keeping in a single ear piercing.
Black, navy blue and gray are going to be your three top colors to choose for your outfit. The main color you want to avoid wearing is red because it’s a powerful color and also has the hidden connotations of danger and anger behind them – two things you don’t want a potential employer to think about.
Before you head over to your interview, remember that first impressions are made before you speak, so choose an outfit to speak for you.